McLaren P12: Teaser Before Paris Debut

September 6, 2012

The upcoming Paris Motor Show (Sept. 29 – Oct. 14) promises to be a monumental (and in all probability, exquisitely detailed) affair for McLaren Automotive. This event will mark McLaren’s first-ever appearance at an International Motor Show and aside from the showcasing of their updated 2013 MP4-12C (and its open-top Spider variant), all eyes will be keenly locked towards the unveil of the ‘spiritual successor’ to the incredible F1 hypercar of the ’90s – the new McLaren ‘P12’.

The above image is the only teaser-image that McLaren has offered-up prior to the unveiling and I couldn’t be happier about that – better to keep these things under wrap and the mind wandering. If anything, it definitely appears to be more dramatic than the slightly humdrum (yet efficiently purposeful) MP4-12C.

Slightly revealing/hinting spy-photo of the P12 prototype’s rear haunch.

Information regarding power and spec is also (understandably) scant at this point in time as well, but definitely expect a modified version of their existing 3.8L, twin-turbo V8 to power the new car (they now believe V12’s are ‘so yesterday’…hmm… Ferrari-jab anyone ?) along with a KERS-style energy recuperation system that could easily report combined power figures in the 750+ bhp area.

We await the official Paris Motor Show unveil…

-Blake J.
AutoInjected.com


McLaren: Striking One-off X1 Debut

August 20, 2012

If you squint really hard, you’ll see it – the MP4-12C underneath it all.

Just last week McLaren unveiled their Can-Am Edition MP4-12C which paid a debt to their racing heritage and focused on their ideas/visions for the future of the company’s racing commitments. Yet then, this weekend at Pebble Beach they go and unveil this – the one-off McLaren X1. The words ‘shock’ and ‘awe’ only hint at what we’re left with…

What you’re looking at here is the result of the McLaren Special Operations unit (MSO) fulfilling the bespoke design influences (and assorted visions) of an unnamed/anonymous McLaren customer/aficianado that displayed an open-chequebook philosophy towards his/her idea of what constitutes ‘vehicular exclusivity’ in this world nowadays. Indeed, the array of chrome flourishes, classic lines, faired-in rear wheels and added-on adenda aren’t exactly in-line with the typical McLaren un-fussy design philosophies… but it’s that marriage of McLaren engineering know-how and one person’s open-wallet exclusivity that makes this entire project so intriguing.

The X1 project was undertaken by McLaren stylist Hong Yeo with design chief Frank Stephenson and MSO Programme Director Paul MacKenzie close by to oversee the progress. The X1 vehicular influences are listed as:  Buick Electra, Mercedes-Benz 540K, Facel Vega, Chrysler D’Elegance Ghia and the Citroën SM. Meanwhile, the architectural influences are listed as: the Guggenheim museums in New York and Bilbao, grand pianos, Airstream caravans, a Thomas Mann Mont Blanc pen and Audrey Hepburn (?).

Granted, those are some heady points of navigation and yet when all encompassed, seem to work, given their grandeur and societal poise. After all, one of the main objectives was to create a car that would look elegant enought to roll up to an opera in… As expected, there’s a lot to focus on with this daring Mclaren X1 one-off, so let’s allow the assorted photos and the official press release (below) to fill-in the necessary details.

-Blake J.
AutoInjected.com

McLaren X1 (Full) Press Release:

McLaren Special Operations (MSO), the division of McLaren Automotive responsible for the delivery of bespoke projects, will present a breathtaking one-off supercar at The Quail, an exclusive event on August 17, 2012 that is a highlight of the Pebble Beach weekend in Monterey, USA.

Called the McLaren X-1 and based structurally on the company’s groundbreaking carbon MonoCell but with a totally unique body, it has been created for an anonymous car enthusiast.

X-1: the brief It’s not every day that a team gets to create something unique in a project that would take the supercar, even by McLaren standards, to a different level. The challenge began with a special brief.

‘One of our clients who already owned a McLaren F1, a Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren and now a 12C, wanted a unique car,’ says MSO Programme Director, Paul MacKenzie. ‘The conversation began with our Executive Chairman Ron Dennis almost three years ago – before the 12C was even launched. The client wanted a machine that had all the capability of the 12C but wrapped in a unique body that reflected his needs and personality.’

In a subsequent meeting, Paul Mackenzie and Design Director Frank Stephenson went to see him to start to explore the sort of car he wanted.

Says Frank Stephenson: ‘The key qualities the client desired were “timeless and classical elegance”. Which was some challenge.’

That meeting with Mackenzie and Stephenson lasted for almost three hours. From the pages of notes that were gathered, the design team brought together hundreds of images from the world of automotive, architecture, fashion, design and even film. These were then presented to the customer, and were then narrowed down to a mood book, full of inspiring images from which the design spirit of this unique car would be derived.

Inspirational cars included a 1961 Facel Vega, a 1953 Chrysler D’Elegance Ghia, a 1959 Buick Electra, a 1939 Mercedes-Benz 540K and a 1971 Citroën SM. There were various examples of architecture – including the Guggenheim museums in New York and Bilbao – plus a Jaeger LeCoultre art deco clock, an Airstream trailer, a Thomas Mann Montblanc pen, a grand piano – and an eggplant. ‘The client liked the shiny texture of the finish,’ notes Stephenson. There was also a black-and-white photo of Audrey Hepburn.

‘The client wanted a competition between external designers – some outside the automotive world – and McLaren’s own designers,’ notes Stephenson. In the end, a design by McLaren’s Korean-born RCA graduate Hong Yeo was chosen, and completed under the direction of Stephenson.

One of the biggest design challenges faced by Yeo was that most cars that embody classic elegance and timeless values have front engines and rear-wheel drive proportions. This is the exact opposite of a mid-engined supercar. So a new visual language for the car had to be found which led to months of sketching and modelling to find that perfect visual balance.

Stephenson recalls: ‘From this design, we then produced a 30 per cent scale model, then a full-size hard foam model. Initially, we planned to do it all digitally but the client insisted on seeing “real” models.

‘The client was very clear in his own mind what he wanted. But the only styling feature prescribed were metal brightwork rails running from the nose, over the shoulderline and hips, to the rear of the greenhouse.’

In the words of Hong Yeo: ‘X-1 embodies the McLaren value that every part has to have a purpose. No details are simply visual cues, every one has a purpose. Although I like to think the wide body combined with pontoon style rear fenders will ensure the car glides when it’s moving just like a superhero’s cape…’

The styling took 18 months to sign off but the result is a design that in a few decades time will be hard to pinpoint exactly when it was created … timeless, therefore, exactly as the client requested.

X-1: the creation The X-1 is the most ambitious example yet of MSO’s expertise. It has a whole new body made of advanced materials. Everything is bespoke, even down to the lights and wheels, necessitating new testing and homologation meaning the car took two and a half years to build, a process that began before the styling was signed off.

The X-1 had its own development programme because crucially, this wasn’t to be a fragile concept car that would never see tarmac. It was to be a usable car, road legal and capable of travelling at supercar speeds. It also had to comfortably seat two adults so although the 12C was already as shrink-wrapped as it could be from a packaging perspective, the ingenious flexibility of the MonoCell allowed the creation of a completely different form while maintaining the engineering purity of a McLaren.

A full CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) aerodynamic testing schedule ensured high-speed stability, and the car also completed approximately 625 miles of testing including two intensive testing stints at the Idiada circuit in Spain with chief McLaren test driver, Chris Goodwin. After testing, the whole car was meticulously rebuilt, by hand to concours standard.

X-1: the detail MSO Programme Director Paul Mackenzie explains: ‘The X-1 showcases the skills of McLaren Special Operations. More and more luxury customers want bespoke or individual features. The X-1 demonstrates that we can provide the ultimate personalisation service. It also shows that MSO is not just a technology led company. X-1 demonstrates a commitment to perfection and to the highest levels of quality.’

All body panels of the X-1 are made from carbon, and are finished in a rich piano black, as specified by the owner. Body sides are lacquered visual carbon fibre. ‘The black paint has no metallic or colour tints and is one of the most challenging colours to paint, but the finish is absolutely exquisite and befits the car perfectly’adds Stephenson.

Components were tooled exclusively for the car. They even include unique head- and taillights, inspired by the McLaren Speed Marque logo. The brightwork is machined from solid aluminium, and a nickel finish is then applied. The McLaren logo in the nose is specially machined from solid aluminium then nickel plated. Wheels are also unique to the X-1, and are diamond turned with a tinted lacquer to complement the exterior nickel-plated brightwork.

The brightwork itself is all machined from solid aluminium, and then nickel finished to give the same hue throughout. Even the McLaren Speed Marque badge in the nose is machined from solid aluminium, then nickel plated.

The same brightwork is used for the over-the-shoulder rails (as specified by the owner), at the base of the windscreen and the back of the glasshouse, and for the ‘eyebrows’ over the bespoke headlights. The McLaren Airbrake rear wing is also machined from solid aluminium and nickel plated, to complement the rest of the brightwork.

Perhaps the most unusual styling feature is the enclosed rear wheels, an upshot of the owner’s desire to have a car reflecting ‘timeless elegance’. The wheels are accessed by carbon panels using, as Stephenson explains, ‘some of the most gorgeous hinges you’ve ever seen’. The styling, too, is in no way compromised by the opening rear wings.

He adds: ‘The attention to detail is astonishing. Neat styling touches feature throughout the design, such as the rear number plate illuminators finished in carbon, a gorgeous machined aluminium cap is used for the header tank, and carbon finishers line the engine bay.’

The doors have also been developed specifically for the X-1, although they retain the dihedral action and twin hinges, and the roof is also new. Externally, only the glasshouse is carried over from the 12C.

The unique body of the X-1 means most dimensions have changed. The X-1 is 4658mm long – 109mm longer than a 12C. Width is 2097mm (with mirrors) – an increase of 188 mm. Despite the revised roofline, the height remains the same, at 1199mm. Kerb weight is almost identical (about 1400kg), as the lighter carbon body panels compensate for the greater length and width. Light weight, as with all McLaren projects, was a priority.

While the basic architecture of the interior did not change, personalisation includes bespoke Harissa Red McLaren Nappa leather used for the seats, door and roof trim, and switchgear with machined nickel-coated, aluminium bezels. The carbon interior trim has a titanium weave, to give a magical 3D-like effect. Special Andesite tufted carpet covers the floor.

All these changes ensured the X-1 needed special homologation for road use. The car has been thoroughly engineered to be usable and road legal. The X-1 shares the same the major mechanical components as the 12C, including the twin-turbo 625PS engine, giving astonishing acceleration and top speed.

Stephenson explains: ‘The X-1 epitomises how we can not only create a truly unique product tailored to the client, but also enable the client to become a key member of the design team throughout the process. It has been a truly rewarding and unforgettable experience. And I think that we as a team have created a completely unforgettable car that is true to one man’s vision.’

Hong Yeo concludes: ‘We designers are often blinded by the sun and assume that whatever we see and understand is the only way forward: to see the stars, sometimes you need the absence of that blinding light … looking at a car from a different perspective is what X-1 stands for.’

After its debut, on the Monterey Peninsular, the X-1 will return to MSO headquarters in Woking and be carefully checked over before it takes a place in the owner’s collection.

‘But it’s certainly not just colour and trim,’ notes Paul Mackenzie. ‘A number of cars have had different front and rear bumpers, which has increased downforce and boosted performance. These cars had to go through full aerodynamic CFD testing before engineering sign-off.’

Adds Mackenzie: ‘We’re here to help the client personalise the car to their precise taste. They typically come to Woking to see us, or talk to their dealer, or we go to see them. We’ll sit down with them, listen to their requests, then come up with a new colour or mechanical components, or – as with X-1 – a new “tailor made” car. Of course we make recommendations but we’re certainly not here to be style police. Every client is different. Our main job is to listen and then to interpret the owner’s requests into a superb car.’

As Mackenzie concludes: ‘This is the first fully client commissioned MSO car, but it certainly won’t be the last. The carbon fibre MonoCell chassis used in the 12C, is not only stiff and light, it allows for great flexibility in body styling and provides an affordable structure from which MSO can develop unique cars, as is demonstrated with X-1.’


McLaren: Inside The Technology Centre – Video

May 23, 2012

Insightfully revealing new video here from the Drive Channel on YouTube showing the inner-workings of the mysterious McLaren Technology Centre. Most of what is shown in the 26-minute video has been previously unseen by film-crews, so to derive some sort of visual access to parallel McLaren’s notoriously precise methods of detailed engineering is a joyful encounter… Enjoy 😉

To be honest (and a bit nit-picky), I’m not entirely sold on the presenter’s abilities (or school-boy wardrobe selection) during this rare opportunity to ask some of the more pertinent and intriguing questions that could/should have been asked… but regardless, a great job by the cameraman/crew in capturing the interior aura and static mood of this near-otherworldly entitiy of McLaren.

-Blake J.
AutoInjected.com


A.I. Commentary: McLaren MP4-12C And Ferrari 458 – Rivals..? Really..?

March 15, 2012

From the motoring folks who recently launched the Drive channel on YouTube, here we have an interesting (and beautifully shot) video from a certain Mr. Chris Harris that raises some questions about the aim of this car when considering the cozy, discreet, Grand Touring-like capabilities and real-world, daily-driven useability of the MP4-12C…

On paper, one would be immediately excused for comparing the mid-engined 3.8L V8 twin-turbo, 592 bhp McLaren with the 4.5L 562 bhp Ferrari 458 – Somewhat similar power outputs, comparable price point, mid-engined V8, well-established racing pedigree on both sides, really really fast, etc… Yet although one could argue that both cars represent each company’s bespoke (and exotic) interpretation of the formula and layout, one could also argue that these two cars aren’t exactly the heated rivals that the motoring press, a certain British motoring TV show and many supercar enthusiasts have made them out to be.

Understated yet conventionally attractive looks have most people 'ho-hum'-ing with regards to its looks...

For starters, one is a raucous, loud, impractical and highly visceral (and visual) experience adorned with beautifully stunning lines riding on conventional (albeit, high-tech) dampers and springs while the other is an extremely relaxing, everyday-useable, long-distance tourer imbued with all of the latest-tech wizardy (hello space-age suspension) that’s been rather discreetly (some would say, boringly) styled with a matching set of (mostly) muted lungs… Their power, price and basic shape/layout is similar, but aside from those traits, I’m beginning to see just how different these two supposed rivals really are…

The stunning Ferrari 458

After reading publications and watching a deluge of head-to-head video tests over the past 6 months involving various rivals  – most notably, the Ferrari 458 – one question seems to jump out moreso than any other: Should the Ferrari and McLaren even be considered rivals…? The McLaren doesn’t exactly shock and fascinate ‘in-the-metal’ despite its eye-candy doors and plethora of exotic materials used in its construction, but it does impress with its to-the-millimetre build quality, road-litheness and general air of keen robustness.

At a recent Concours Show in our fair city, the McLaren didn't exactly 'wow' the crowds moreso than it gained people's respect as an incredible 'all-rounder'

The more I look at it (and I looked at it for a long time back in September, as the photos show), the more I’m inclined to view this new McLaren as a Premium high-end spiritual successor to the tech-fest Honda NSX from the early ’90s – a phenomenally-engineered, precision-built, fast-yet-comfortable, mid-engined ‘everyday’ GT sportscar with Jekyll & Hyde-like attributes – one who’s modern-day main rival really is the Porsche 911 Turbo… not the look-at-me-dance Ferrari 458…

The 458 doing what it loves to do best...

With its understated outer-shell design (minus the fancy doors) and plush interior complete with classy nods to exotic materials and bespoke functionality – not to mention its luxuriously appointed ride quality – the MP4-12C, at least to these eyes, really seems to be aimed more towards the discerning driver that isn’t at all interested in flash attributes, going sideways, making noise and standing out… A driver that would just rather enjoy pootling along with Rolls-Royce levels of ride quality alongside bang-up-to-date tech with the promise of truly eye-watering speed and handling capabilities… if called upon.

Looks like a Supercar (albeit, a slightly dated one) from the back... doesn't sound like one though.

After soaking-in all of these high-profile, head-to-head tests (and mostly losing them) the McLaren has taken more than its unfair share of flack for its apparent inability to excite and entertain in the ways that the Ferrari so readily does… Yet I ask this: Taking price, power and basic layout out of the equation, how close, actually, are these two cars in terms of being labelled as direct rivals…?

Your thoughts and opinions, as always, are welcomed…!

-Blake J.
AutoInjected.com

-McLaren Photos by: Blake J./AutoInjected.com


McLaren MP4-12C: Mansory Works Their Magic

March 1, 2012

Aaah Mansory… Love ’em or loathe ’em, the German tuners always manage to serve up something that prompts immediate reactions from auto enthusiasts – either via shielding their eyes, staring in half-chuckling amazement or by simply clicking the ‘share’ button… of which I’m sure their latest go at the MP4-12C will illicit similar responses.

But ‘instant reactions’ is what Mansory is all about; boldly standing out in a crowd full of pablum-faced dullies and brushing away the conventional safety taste-nets that inhabit our motoring world… (at least that’s what I believe Mansory-owners tell themselves…) And yet, going by past efforts, this offering from Mansory almost seems watered-down and far less flamboyant… It should be violent purple with orange ostrich-hide accents and have matte gold, everywhere…

Set for unveiling at the Geneva Motor Show, what we have here is their latest creation in the form of a heavily carbon-fibre’d (the mirror housings, wings, roof, front and rear apron), be-winged, blinged, tuned and re-sculpted MP4-12C – essentially, a ‘styling showcase’ to advertise their (many) various mods made available for the new McLaren. The car’s bodywork is 60mm wider than before and downforce is increased thanks to the various splitters and big wing out back. Also, Mansory claims their new side-sill design ‘steadies the airflow between the two axles’… just like a racecar..!

Tuning for the MP4-12C arrives in the form of an altered air filter, engine re-management and exhaust system to assist in the 670 bhp / 498 lb ft output to the wheels which, of course, have been enlarged to 20″ and 21″ respectively. 220 mph is said to be the Mansory MP4-12C’s new top speed now as well, which is only relevant if you live near one of the 2 or 3 places in the world where such speeds can be (somewhat-safely) achieved…

All in, not quite the blatantly vulgar look-at-ME offering that we’ve become accustomed to from the bespoke/visionary Mansory folks whenever an over-indulged ‘showcase’ creation is rolled out from them… Un-click some of those styling options from the build-spec sheet and you’d almost have a pretty tasty-looking McLaren on your hands. Mansory going slightly soft and displaying a new maturity on us…?!? Good heavens…

-Blake J.
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Spotted: McLaren MP4-12C ‘HS’ Version – Video

January 17, 2012

A cosmetically tweaked new version of the McLaren MP4-12C has been spotted at a Miami, Florida dealer sporting an ‘HS’ or ‘High Sport’ moniker on its rear bumper. Having been created by McLaren’s long-standing Special Vehicles Operations division (responsible for such past madness as the Mercedes-McLaren SLR 722 and various ‘special’ McLaren F1s from the ’90s), this HS is one of just 5 examples that were special-ordered by a commercial partner of McLaren. Four of them are slated to be sold by the Miami dealer seen in the video below.

As is the norm for a company like McLaren with its roots firmly planted (and dominating) in the F1 arena, constant evolution is the name of the game. McLaren are no strangers to instilling drastic changes to their cars within an amazingly short amount of time as that is exactly how they build their cars to begin with – purposely designed from the offset to invite gradual alterations, endless tweaks and upgrades on-the-fly throughout the lifespan of their creations.

Last year, I attended the Luxury & Supercar Concours held in our fair city and I was treated to an exclusive one-on-one with the still-developing MP4-12C. Most of the exterior tweaks, upgrades and such were on display with their newest showcar and you could easily sense that McLaren has been trying to instigate more ’emotion’ and ‘aggression’ after its rather bland/lacklustre beginnings when the MP4-12C was initially launched to the public. Visit our own High-res MP4-12C wallpaper gallery of this one-off showcar here.

A spider version (with folding hardtop roof) of the MP4-12C is slated for later on in 2012, but it goes without saying that everyone is really waiting for the road-going variant of the current GT3 racer to emerge…

-Blake J. 
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Exclusive: HD pics of Pre-Production Prototype 2012 McLaren MP4-12C

September 22, 2011

**** A.I. Exclusive of the 2012 McLaren MP4-12C Pre-Production Prototype HD photo-album (in various Wallpaper sizes) can be found here. ****

At the recent Luxury & Supercar Weekend held at the spectacular VanDusen Gardens, there was a pre-show ‘Press/Media’ event held on the Friday morning within the grounds to offer various scribes and TV crews an exclusive, unhurried view of some of the vehicles on display. Taking advantage of my close proximity to VanDusen (a mere 15-minute walk), I gathered myself up and procured an early entry into the Gardens.

MP4-12C Prototype glowing in the early-morning sun

Upon walking down the path leading into the Show area of VanDusen, I was immediately struck by a sight that any petrolhead would find enticingly exotic and decidedly fitting of the weekend’s upcoming proceedings – A ferociously sonorous-sounding Maserati MC-12 being driven on the lawn with a stunning pale-green 1930’s Peugeot Super Sport and a satin-paint finished McLaren MP4-12C glowing in the background…

Lynne (McLaren Marketing & Communications) arriving from New York with her British friend

Yet this wasn’t just any McLaren MP4-12C, this was one of the 3 Pre-production Prototypes that travel the world to not only showcase McLaren’s undeniable excellence in the car’s (still-evolving) engineering, but also to tempt potential buyers into the company’s own ‘McLaren Exclusive’ customization program. Truly beautiful carbon-fibre accessories (I really thought the carbon exhaust-tips were ace) and trims were adorned all throughout this McLaren from the rear engine-breather intake to the glossy ‘MP4-12C’ stamped on the visually appealing sill once you raised the elegantly-damped doors skyward.

The satin paint finish alone was extraordinary. Many times throughout the Friday and Saturday sun-filled days I was drawn back to the McLaren to gaze at this profoundly I-am-guessing-expensive paint-option. With the afternoon sun striking its flanks from various angles, it glows in a manner not far off from your stove-top element maxxed-out to 10, with the kitchen lights turned off. It’s shadows were soft and complementary… alien-like. As I said in the original piece; overall, it’s a thing of subtle, controlled beauty.

Carbon-fibre extras adorned this Prototype beauty - I especially liked the exhaust tips

One recent addition to the McLaren Customization Program that is immediately regarded as an improvement in the (sadly lacking) aggression department is the vented front wings. Borrowed from the recently unveiled McLaren MP4-12C GT3 racecar, they seem to embellish the mood of the car with animalistic fury and break-up the continuity in a rather complementary fashion. Despite the truly astronomical price for what is essentially some rectangular slashes over the tops of your front fenders (over $17,000 …!), they are now near-essentials in my eyes.

It's all in the up-close details with the MP4-12C - wish I could have driven it..!

All in, if you decided to include all of the variously yummy carbon/trim accessories and strking 20″ wheels shown on this rare prototype, you’ll be asked to excuse an additional $50,000 towards the $230,000 price-tag, before taxes – ouch. But then, as is always the case at this price-point, an extra $30-$50K in alluring extras/essentials is hardly going to turn people off.

The McLaren MP4-12C’s initial entry onto the automotive supercar scene was greeted with somewhat valid qualms of unimaginative/safe styling married to a slightly lucid and distanced driving experience (more akin to a soulless-yet-fiercely-competant mechanical device). But seeing as how McLaren is rapidly responding to these criticisms in an unbelievably quick rate of turn-around (they’re an F1 company after all – quick turnaround in engineering practices is what they know/do best) and then inviting the Press to come and re-try the car again after only 8 days… is kind-of extraordinary. I like that though – they took the initial (and widespread) criticisms on the chin and then immediately went to work at improving/altering the dynamics of those questionable areas.

-Many thanks to Lynne Arciero, McLaren Marketing & Communications Manager – North America, for the exclusive access to the MP4-12C

words/photos: Blake J.

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http://www.autoinjected.com/community/blogs/blog-post/id/94895/name/exclusive%3a-hd-pics-of-pre~production-prototype-2012-mclaren-mp4~12c


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